I recently attended Oracle OpenWorld for the first time in several years. The message at this year’s event was clear: Oracle is all in on the cloud. I had heard the message, but I didn’t get the full impact until I arrived at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. All signage at the event contained the word “cloud,” and Oracle issued 18 press releases in conjunction with OpenWorld related to cloud computing. I also found out that Oracle has its own definition of “cloud.”

Oracle now offers cloud services ranging from infrastructure as a service, which competes with Amazon Web Services, to database as a service to big data as a service to analytics as a service. These are in addition to Oracle applications offered in software-as-a-service configurations. Some years ago Larry Ellison expressed public resistance to “cloud computing”, but since then Oracle has been steadily investing in, adopting and now fully embracing it. Oracle’s direction reflects what our benchmark research has been showing for years: Cloud computing is being adopted ever more widely. For example, our Data and Analytics in the Cloud research shows that nearly half (48%) of organizations use cloud-based analytics today and virtually all (99%) expect to use cloud-based analytics eventually. The research also shows that one in four (24%) have the majority of their data in the cloud today and 86 percent expect the majority of their data to be in the cloud eventually.

In the big data and analytics market, Oracle offers the following cloud services:

  • Oracle Exadata Cloud Service – massively parallel processing (MPP) SQL database
  • Oracle Business Intelligence Cloud Service – business intelligence and visualization
  • Oracle Big Data Cloud Service – Cloudera Enterprise (Hadoop) and data integration
  • Oracle Data Visualization Cloud Service – self-service data visualization
  • Oracle Big Data Preparation Cloud Service – self-service data preparation
  • Oracle Big Data Discovery Cloud Service – data science with data preparation and visualization
  • Oracle GoldenGate Cloud Service – data replication and streaming data
  • Oracle NoSQL Database Cloud Service – key value store.

Oracle has also announced Oracle Essbase Cloud Service for multidimensional analysis and Oracle Big Data SQL Cloud Service for SQL on Hadoop and NoSQL. Oracle’s Big Data Compute Edition will allow organizations to scale Hadoop compute nodes and data nodes independently. All of these are indicated on the Oracle website as “coming soon.”

Faced with such a broad portfolio of big data and analytics capabilities, it may be a challenge for potential customers to understand the portfolio and decide which pieces are required for their organization. Fortunately, services based in the cloud are easier to try since no installation is required and subscription-based licensing doesn’t require long-term commitments to products.

Part of Oracle’s value proposition, based on its long devotion to the old model of on-premises licensing and management, is a mixture of cloud and on-premises deployments, often referred to as hybrid cloud. Oracle’s cloud services are available in three vr_dac_24_data_integration_between_systemsconfigurations: as a public cloud service subscription; as a managed private cloud service subscription managed by Oracle in the customer’s data center; and licensed as an on-premises deployment managed by the customer. Oracle is betting that this flexibility with be attractive to enterprises as they make their journey to the cloud. Amazon, the key cloud competitor highlighted in Oracle’s keynotes, does not offer on-premises or hybrid configurations. Our research finds that nearly half (47%) of organizations support integration of cloud-based data with on-premises data and 38 percent vice versa, suggesting a significant presence of hybrid deployments.

We should note that most of Oracle’s big data and analytic cloud services are not new. In fact, most of Oracle’s portfolio competes with other products that have been in the market for years. Its strength is to excel at making products enterprise-ready. Others may find new and innovative ways to tackle computing challenges, but as these innovations take root in the market, Oracle adopts them, hardens them and makes them available for critical applications. It also adds innovations around the edges, but fundamentally Oracle makes these capabilities industrial-strength for dealing with issues such as security, reliability, manageability and governance – necessities that are often overlooked as new products come to market. If your organization needs to support mission-critical big data and analytics, I recommend you consider Oracle’s offerings. They have the breadth and depth to meet most needs.


David Menninger

SVP & Research Director

Follow Me on Twitter @dmenningerVR and Connect with me on LinkedIn.

Teradata recently held its annual Partners conference, at which gather several thousand customers and partners from around the world. This was the first Partners event since Vic Lund was appointed president and CEO in May. Year on year, Teradata’s revenues are down about 5 percent, which likely prompted some changes at the company. Over the past few years Teradata made several technology acquisitions and perhaps spread its resources too thin. At the event, Lund committed the company to a focus on customers, which was a significant part of Teradata’s success in the past. This commitment was well received by customers I spoke with at the event.

I also had a chance to talk with Oliver Ratzesberger, Teradata’s EVP and chief product officer, about the company’s focus and product direction. For the near term, Ratzesberger said, its focus remains on selling to and supporting new and existing customers in the largest 1,000 global enterprises, but in the longer term Teradata wants to win over the development community, too. As a large-scale provider of databases and big data management tools, Teradata competes to some extent with the Hadoop ecosystem I have written about. Teradata likely has encountered new challenges in growing revenue since the advent of Hadoop, but the company also embraces Hadoop. Its Aster Analytics product now runs on Hadoop (and AWS), the company offers a Hadoop appliance as well as Presto for SQL on Hadoop, and Think Big, its analytics consulting group helps design, implement and manage Hadoop-based systems. Management took these steps after recognizing that the company needs to coexist with the growing Hadoop ecosystem.

Ratzesberger pointed to other developer-friendly changes as well. Teradata Query Grid 2.0 has become a platform for monitoring and managing a heterogeneous combination of data sources, not just a tool for routing queries. Workload management has always been a strength of Teradata, and it is now seeking to extend those capabilities to non-Teradata systems via Query Grid. Teradata Listener, for ingesting streams of information such as Internet of Things (IoT) device data, allows developers to simply register the service, get an API key and develop in their language of choice using a RESTful API and JSON data structures.

Concurrently with the event Teradata announced vr_dac_03_use_of_cloud_for_data_storagenew cloud-based offerings including for AWS and Azure. These options should make it easier for developers to get started with Teradata since there is no hardware to acquire and install. The company has been moving in the direction of embracing the cloud for several years and now offers a full range of private cloud, managed cloud and public cloud options. As part of the conference, I gave a presentation entitle Why Your Data and Analytics Should Live in the Cloud. Among the most significant findings from our benchmark research that I shared is that 40 percent of organizations reported that they expect the majority of their data to be in the cloud within 12 months and twice as many (86%) said they expect the majority of their data to be in the cloud eventually.

My key takeaway from the conference is that while we may not see changes overnight, there are signs that Teradata is seeking to extend its influence beyond the largest organizations in the world. Much of new development emanates from smaller companies that seek to embrace open source, low cost and easy-to-adopt technologies. The announcements Teradata made at the Partners conference help to move the company in that direction. If you are evaluating cloud-based analytical databases, I recommend that you consider Teradata as one of the options.


David Menninger

SVP & Research Director

Follow Me on Twitter @dmenningerVR and Connect with me on LinkedIn.

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